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with a striking new assessment of al qaeda. >>> final edition for a tabloid caught up in its own scandal. is there more to come? >>> and royal treatment. will and kate bring their charming style to the u.s. carrying on a long family tradition. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. betty ford, a former dancer, stay-at-home mom of four, and wife of a michigan congressman, never could have imaged the strange circumstances that in 1974 would land her and her husband, gerald ford, into the white house, but for a role she was unprepared for, first lady of the united states, she made a lot of it and changed thousands if not millions of lives in the process. betty ford died last night in california at the age of 93. she was known for speaking her mind, even when it didn't jive with her husband's political agenda, but she is best remembered for putting a public face to some awfully personal struggles and inspiring americans, particularly women, in ways no other first lady had. at the ford museum in grand rapids, michigan, her childhood home, betty ford was remembered tod
of the assassination of osama bin laden, how would you describe the al qaeda threat and what it poses today? i know you have said it is significant and it remains the most significant threat to the united states in combination with regional affiliates that were dispersed and as you mentioned it is certainly a dynamic and complex environment and certainly an asymmetrical threat. how to identify, how to quantify. where do you think we stand today in terms of one, mitigating the threat and certainly since the killing of osama bin laden? >> thank you very much senator. the threat i think today is as diffuse and as complex and challenging as it is. certainly it is the case that again, through the leaders of congress and the hard work of thousands of men and women both in the intelligence community and the military we have made substantial progress against al qaeda and its affiliates. and the killing of osama bin laden was a significant milestone in that effort. it is clear i think from the threat of information i have seen both beginning in 2004 when i started working with the fbi and my time at the departm
changed -- about al-qaeda, has also changed. becoming in some ways, more elusive. with the death of osama bin laden two months ago, the united states has arrived at a milestone of sorts. many are asking what does this mean? how do we assess the threat now? what work remains to be done? what strategy is most appropriate for this new phase? here to discuss this with us today is someone i know to be one of the nation's most dedicated public servants, john brennan, assistant to the president for homeland security and counterterrorism. it is hard to imagine anyone better prepared for these responsibilities than john brennan. prior to joining the president in 2009, he had a lengthy career in government and in the private sector. counter-terrorism has been a thread running through his career since the early 1990's. a graduate of fordham university and the university of texas at austin, he served for 25 years at the cia, beginning in 1980. during that time, he held major responsibilities in analysis, overseas operations, and leadership at cia headquarters. he served as chief for the cia station i
, al-qaeda -- they are synonymous in our minds? >> al qaeda it is terror group number one, but it is broader than that. there are terrorists all over the world. most people believe that terrorist -- there will be more terrorist groups in the future. >> that is kind of frightening. we never knew suicide bombers and things like that. now, all of a sudden, they will show up in countries all over the world, throw bombs, ied's. >> this form of terrorism was started in tamil. >> what is the form? >> suicide bombers, both male and female. was president bush -- >> was president bush on tiger when he used the phrase "war and terror -- "war on terror"? i think -- >> i think he was. it also needs to be understood that this is not a war on instruments. a can not always be fought by military means -- it cannot always be fought by military means, though that can be effective. there are a lot of different tactics to adopt in this war. it will go on for decades. >> in addition to creating fear, do the terrorists have clear-cut goals in mind when they embark on creating this year? -- fear?
offered a new assessment of al qaeda. nbc's pentagon correspondent jim miklacieski is traveling with him. >> reporter: it was on the flight over when he dropped the bombshell on al qaeda. >> we're within reach of strategically defeating al qaeda. >> reporter: panetta said the killing of osama bin laden by u.s. commandos two months ago and in an increasingly intense campaign of predator air strikes aimed at top terrorist leaders has staggered al qaeda. >> i think we had undermined their ability to conduct 9/11-type attacks. i think we had them on the run. >> reporter: in kabul general david petraeus agreed. >> al qaeda's senior leadership is less capable of threatening. >> reporter: intelligence indicates al qaeda's new leader is holed up in the tribal regions of western pakistan. he also revealed that up to 20 top al qaeda leaders from pakistan, yemen, and somalia were identified from intelligence found in bin laden's compound and are now on america's target list. topping that list, american-born cleric anwar, leader of al qaeda in yemen, considered the greatest terrorist threat to the u
an to the threat the u.s. homeland fees' is with somalia affiliate's of osama bin laden's al qaeda and anwar al-awlaki's al qaeda and the peninsula, aqap. the committee's been briefed by agencies and we've interviewed dozens of experts on al-shabaab. i want to welcome our distinguished panel of witnesses. they've shown the most extensive insight into the problems and covered by the committee investigation we have grateful they are sharing knowledge with us today. you will hear who been london called one of the most important enemies, excuse me, one of the most important armies of islam engaged in ongoing successful effort to recruit and radicalize dozens of muslim american jihadis who pose a direct threat to the united states. some argue that al-shabaab is only a somalia problem and the group will never strike outside the horn of africa region. that kind of thinking is a glaring example of the 9/11 commission called a failure of imagination. with al-shabaab and the unquestionable ties to al qaeda particularly the alliance with aqap we must face the reality that al-shabaab is a growing threat to
takes tougher action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan as i was mentioning. panetta is meeting with american military leaders as well as afghan officials. atia abawi is in kabul, afghanistan. he's making strong remarks when it comes to al qaeda and how he wants to continue stamping them out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. that's absolutely right. on his flight from d.c. to kabul he did speak to reporter on the plane that he was on about al qaeda and said that the strategic defeat of al qaeda was within reach, pointing to the death of osama bin laden, pointing to the information that we were able to retrieve from his compound, including the names of key leaders that they'd like to go after. and he says that this is the time to go after al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> reporter: al qaeda aside, this is afghanistan. he's on
. >> nos vamos al qaeda otro lado del munod un terremoto de 7. >> en japon y cientos de pedrsonas salieron a las calles de atlanta para protestar por la nueva ley migratoria. >> un juex federal bloqueo 2 partes de la ley. en niaragua el aumento en los precios. >> cada día se nos dificulta estudiar en este pais es una desmostracion de cidadanos que estamos muy molestos por que no hay progreso no hay trabjao. >> para este diputado es un derecho ciudadano. >> esta marcha tiene fundamentos no solo para reclamar si no que tambien para ganar puntos en el proceso elecytoral que estamos. >> la policia nacional a tomado la desicion de manera responsable y a autorizado las manifestaciones que se realizaran en 2 tiempos y lugares dstintis. >> en noticias de america américa:las farc anunciaron movilizacion. >> según versiones de prensa. >> estallo un coche bomba quizo estallar un hombre. >> en mexico al qaeda menos 40 personas murieron. >> en el bar savino gordo las autoridades locales piensan que es un multihomicidio organizado, una de las personas asesinadas es mujer. >> hay que decir que la ola
, the dessel's light which explores the idea of a nuclear threat from al qaeda. what happens when al qaeda-style is a bonnet tries to detonated on the tenth anniversary of 9/11? mr. patterson the answer is that in a thriller that features a lineup of interesting characters including the u.s. intelligence figure and a work channeler who may or may not save the day to read mr. patterson was a lawyer before becoming a writer serving as an assistant attorney general for the state of ohio. he also worked as a lawyer for the securities exchange commission. he's been chairman of the organization common cause and has written for such publications as the times of london and "the washington post." many works have been international bestsellers and i daresay that the devil's list will join that list. please welcome richard north patterson. [applause] >> it's great to see you and to have read your book. the devil's why doesn't refer to osama bin laden's flashlight but to the light emitted from a nuclear weapon, and this is a very serious subject, and people who know your career will not be surprised t
security officials raise the red flag on a group related to al qaeda and they are centered in somalia. they reportedly plan to recruit americans and attack american interests in europe and the u.s. mainland. >> the information is alarming. recruiting americans as terrorist to strike out against their own country. the terror group was able to pull recruits from several u.s. states, i including virginia. a threat seemingly half a world away but with roots here at home set alarms often washington. >> probably the next most significant terrorist threat may emanate from the al qaeda presence in somalia. >> that al qaeda presence -- before osama bin laden died, he was urging the group to target the u.s.. the group's recruitment tactics has authorities on high alert. >> not al qaeda or any of its affiliates have come close to drawing sellout muslim americans and westerners to jihad. >> at least 40 americans of a somali dissent fought alongside radicals in somalia and last three years, including three suicide bombers. authorities say the group recruited american fighters from acros
that motivates the terrorism. i describe in the book, fred, i have sat down with al-qaeda-linked terrorists face to face, associates of osama bin laden who have told me we're not doing this because of poverty, not because of the israeli/palestinian conflict. we are doing this because islam's core texts command us to do it. now, that's very politically incorrect, but this is no time to mince words, fred, as you know. and this is not me saying it, it's the bad guys saying this themselves. we should, in this case at least, we should heed their words. .. >> but what it has always been is a deep commitment to islam and from what i can tell, strict islam, shari'a law. shari'a law, as you define it -- >> guest: well, let them ask you, you do a great description of what shari'a is. why don't you tell us what shari'a law is and what it undermines all the ideology you were talking about. >> guest: shari'a, and this is the fundamental thing to remember here. shari'a is inherently incompatible with the u.s. constitution. >> host: no that's what faisal the grand imam of ground zero who was somewhat demoted.
the war? tonight, the stunning statement by the new defense secretary. what he's now saying about al qaeda. >>> courage and candor. rerembering the first lady who bravely spoke about that moment her husband and family confronted her about addictiti. >>> on the red carpet. prince william and kate in california tonight. this evening, british royalty, meeting hollywood's royalty. tom hanks to barbra streisand. who is on the list tonight? >>> and payday. on a day of baseball history. >> that is struck deep to left field. >> the fans actually getting paid to watch this historic home run. >>> good evening on this saturday night. as we come on the air this evening, the printing press is coming to a halt. the last of the papers coming off the press at "the news of the world," that now infamous british tabloid. rocked by revelations its reporters bribed police and eavesdropped on everyone, from the royals to everyday victims of crime. here is the final front page tonight. thank you and good-bye, it says. the paper is shutting down after scandalous behavior within. now, this evening, its owner, the
a new al qaeda threat to air safety. a possible al qaeda resurgence as u.s. troops look for some in afghanistan and outrage over the obama administration's handling of a somali terrorist. they say the department of homeland security is warning air carriers it has new intelligence suggesting terrorists are looking to board flights with surgically implanted explosive devices. the transportation safety administration declined to be that specific, but he acknowledged the new warning. >> the information we have shared concerns information that has been obtained by the u.s. government that describes a new technique to circumvent our current screening protocols around the world or in the u.s. i'll leave it at that. >> u.s. officials are declining as of yet to tell us the exact origins of this new intelligence, though pistole says they're trying to adapt it to improved security screening efforts. >> we see this as the latest evolution of what terrorist groups were trying to do to circumvent our security layers and to perhaps defeat our societal norms. >> more on that story a bit later to
-- into the courtroom, san diego, to investigate this new generation, what i call al qaeda 2.0. what we see is this new generation is using our technology against us in a way that we never sought a decade ago. i call them a new digital jihad ist. but the this new leader is emailing or blogging, he is kind of like a facebook friend from hell, and that is how he spent as idolatry on hate. host: you look at a lot of the terrorists who have perpetrated things over the last decade. take us through how connected he is. guest: the book began with a simple question. one of my colleagues asked me after fort hood, how are americans old enough to remember 9/11 are willing to turn back on their own country less than a decade later. i could not get my mind around what happened on 9/11. you have the fingerprints of this man who has become a household name, but at that time was very unknown. in many of these cases like the one we saw in seattle last week is that individuals that are home grown, they are followers of his lecture and ideology on the web. he went to engineering school here in the united states and was b
. trouble hearing on the phone? visit sprintrelay.com. >>> new revelations about a state of al-qaeda. this in a "washington post" front page record. intelligence recovered at osama bin laden's compound show the leader has serious concerns about the health of the al-qaeda network. meanwhile, "the daily beast" reports heightened concerns of a terror attack as law enforcement tracks an uptick of online chatter about avenging bin laden's death. evan, good morning to you. let's talk about the increased chatter, first of all. we're looking at the ultimate patriotic american holiday right here. how much does this concern you? >> there are home grown extremists out there that would love to make a statement just a few weeks after the death of osama bin laden. it's the number one u.s. patriotic holiday. you can see where someone would want to make a statement. of course, there's also al-qaeda and they are still looking to avenge the death of bin laden. they're looking for a high profile day. a day like july fourth, like the september 11th anniversary. it's a concern. al-qaeda's having a proble
and the region. as you said, bin laden is dead and had a huge impact on al- qaeda, but it did not eliminate al-qaeda. their leadership still lives there, and they threaten to plot and kill as many americans as they possibly can. we need to continue the press on al-qaeda and defeat them. strategically defeat them. that can only be done there. secondly, we are, with respect to afghanistan, we are working our way through a long-term strategic agreement right now, which, to which afghanistan president hamid karzai has indicated strong support. all of that is tied to a long- term partnership there. the idea that -- afghanistan president hamid karzai wants us to leave is one i just don't sign up to. we certainly had our challenges with respect to being there and dealing with the afghanistan president hamid karzai government, that said, we worked our way through a lot of that, david patraeus in particular, the civilian fese. the private contractor piece. we, with the afghans, developed a afghanistan national security force that has got increasingly better. that's really the long-term answers. >> your confi
secretary. what he's now saying about al qaeda. >>> courage and candor. remembering the first lady who bravely spoke about that moment. her husband and family confronted her about addiction. >>> on the red carpet. prince william and kate in california tonight. this evening, british royalty, meeting hollywood's royalty. tom hanks to barbra streisand. who is on the list tonight? >> 3,000. history with an exclamation point. >>> good evening on this saturday night. as we come on the air this evening, the printing press is coming to a halt. the last of the papers coming off the press at "the news of the world," that infamous british tabloid. rocked by revelations its reporters bribed police and eavesdropped on everyone, from the royals to victims of crime. the paper is shutting down of scandalous behavior within. now, this evening, itsowner, the media baron, rupert murdoch, is rushing from the u.s. to london, to protect his media empire. and jeffrey kofman is in london tonight. jeffrey? >> reporter: good evening, david. behind me, the editors and the repopoers have put together the final ed
literally. the search after the suspect. >> bombs inside the body, al qaeda and it's shocking new threats. countdown to history. >> the final shuttle launch is in 36 hours. anticipation. >>> >>> live and in hd, this is 11, on your side. >>> we begin tonight with the brazen attacker who took a hammer to a speed the operatorth inside. along 295.ed police shot down that highway for nearly three hours. >> of all of the reasons why are shut down from time to time, this could be one of the strangest. this arm demand is still on the list tonight, is he a menace to the public? for anare still looking literally walked busy parkway with a and a shotgun. >> i did not want to be on the all today. >> it was around 11:31 a strange be in a 60'sto from the woods. he began destroying a mobile speed camera vehicle. in a state contractor was wheel. behind the >> it does not mean that your e when you leave it. >> the suspect smashed eight began beating on white jeep. the bad -- the man began yelling and dashed back into the woods. all lines were shut down and snarled for more than three hours. >> you could n
the idea of a nuclear threat from al qaeda. what happens when al qaeda steals obama tries to detonate it on the 10th anniversary of 9/11? esther patterson answers that in a thrill that features a lineup of interesting characters, including a u.s. intelligence agent named brooke chanda who may or may not save the day. mr. patterson was a lawyer before becoming a writer concert at one point as assistant attorney general for the state of ohio. he also worked as a lawyer for the securities and exchange commission that he has been chairman of the organization common cause and has written for such publications as the times of london and the "washington post." many of his works have been international sellers, and i daresay that "the devil's light" will join that list. is welcome richard north patterson. [applause] >> it's great to see you and to have read your book, "the devil's light" doesn't refer to osama bin laden's flashlight but to the light emitted from a nuclear weapon. and this is a very serious subject, and people who know your career will not be surprised that you have tackled th
that narrative and the al qaeda narrative of undifferentiated, violent opposition, right, with no affirmative plan and the iranian narrative. i think over the long haul, this is a further isolating set of events for the iranians and not something where they're going to have an advantage. >> when we come back, i'm ask tom donlin, the national security adviser whether we're drawing down in afghanistan too fast. so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even deposit checks right from your phone. just take a picture, hit deposit and you're done. open an account today and put schwab mobile to work for you. >>> we are back with tom donilon, national security adviser to president obama. apparently general petraeus was urging a slower withdrawal to consolidate the gains of the surge. isn't there a risk that in drawing down too fast you allow the violence to return to afghanistan? there are some indications it's already happening. >> well, the decision in afghanistan was made
: ...an extraordinary expansion of manhunt missions that have taken out thousands of al qaeda and taliban fighters. >> if you're trying to take down an insurgency, you take away its safe havens, you take away its leaders. >> hit the guy on the road. >> the joint special operations command is almost an industrial- scale counterterrorism killing machine. >> narrator: frontline investigates the latest us strategy... >> bludgeon your opponent. kill and capture as many as you can. make them ask for peace. >> narrator: ...its impact and its risks. >> by launching those attacks, are we creating more militants than in fact we are killing? >> narrator: can this campaign of killing and capturing make the difference? >> it could take years. i mean, i don't think anybody knows. >> bin laden's gone. that creates the kind of space in which diplomacy might actually be able to make progress. >> narrator: tonight on frontline , "kill/capture." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding i
of the angles, and here are some of the other stories we will dig into as well. the end of al qaeda? some say bin laden's death has the terrorists on the ropes. but other security experts have their doubts. remember the last time we heard "mission accomplished"? and ronald reagan called it the 11th commandment. republicans shall not attack other republicans. that commandment was shattered today. can john boehner pick up the pieces? then, in a new poll his numbers are higher than congress. he gets good marks for job creation. but for disaster relief not so much. no, it's not the president. even mr. obama answers to this higher authority. now let's get back to our top story. on capitol hill tonight speaker john boehner has just rewritten his plan to raise the debt ceiling. he had to after the congressional budget office said his numbers did not add up. now the question is can he sell it to his own party? cnn congressional correspondent kate bolduan is on capitol hill tonight, and kate, the speaker clearly took the whip to his party today. i guess my biggest question to start the night off is ar
of defense. on the flight over, he surprised many when he declared that al qaeda was on the ropes. >> we're within reach of strategically defeating al qaeda. >> reporter: in baghdad today, panetta misspoke when he appeared to suggest to these soldiers that the u.s. invaded iraq because of al qaeda. >> the reason you guys are here, is because on 9/11, the united states got attacked. >> reporter: but there's no evidence of al qaeda presence in iraq before the invasion. panetta explained later he was talking about al qaeda in iraq today. throughout this trip, panetta showed he's a different kind of defense secretary, bold and outspoken. >> damn it, make a decision. >> reporter: and when talking about osama bin laden, brash. >> and to get that son of a bitch. >> reporter: will there be more? >> hey, i'm italian, what can i tell you? >> reporter: at 73, panetta has already had a lifetime of public service. and he told us today he took the pentagon job because he loves the work. and so far, brian, there's no holding him back. >> all right, jim miklaszewski traveling with the secretary tonight.
at the afghan mission in the past decade. >> their mission was to draw out the taliban and deny al qaeda the most important base. planned to last just a few weeks, the war in afghanistan still goes on a decade later. president george bush gave the order to attack. >> these carefully targeted actions are designed to disrupt the use of afghanistan as a terrorist base of operations. and to attack the military capability of the taliban regime. >> the terrorist mastermind behind the 9/11 attacks were based in afghanistan. united nations spoke of a threat to world peace. >> from the american point of view, there was no alternative. in a situation like this, an american president is expected to act decisively, and that he -- that means the use of military force. >> nato and vote its mutual defense costs for the first time in its history. member states sent thousands of soldiers. most came from the u.s., britain, france, and germany. german troops were sent to northern afghanistan. operations seem to be going slowly at the start. hundreds of taliban and al qaeda fighters were caught. but the hea
al qaeda. >>> plus, road rage on the tour de france. a french tv car sends a group of cyclists flying into a barbed wire fence. we'll have the fallout ahead in sports. whoa! >>> but first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. here at 30 rock in new york city. >>> with weeks to go before the aulgt 2nd deadline, congressional leaders are heading back to the white house today for another meeting to try to reach a deal on raising the country's debt ceiling. after a 75-minute session with lawmakers last night, president obama is expected to hold a news conference this morning to discuss their deficit reduction efforts. this comes as the front page of "the wall street journal" reads, deficit negotiations hit reset. divisions on spending cuts and tax increases remain. the journal and others report that last night president obama urged leaders to strive for the largest package possible, over $4 trillion in spending cuts over ten years. but saturday night house speaker john boehner said he will seek a smaller deal and that a larger agreement will not work because of differences on tax reven
to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is poignant today on a plot executed by al qaeda and extremists with the same perverted ideology as the september 11th attacks. 375 british service men and women have died fighting in afghanistan to strengthen that country and keep britain and britain safe from another 9/11 or 7/7. thousands more including many civilians have risked their lives and hundreds have been injured fighting for the security of our nation. they were called to an international coalition involving 48 countries with a specific you and mandate working at the invitation of a democratically elected government. though there have been many difficult times we should be clear about what has been achieved. in 2009 my predecessor, the prime minister told this house that some three quarters of this serious terrorist plots against britain linked afghanistan and pakistan. we must always be on guard. i am advised this figure is significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the talib
be some kind of outside plot, possibly linked to al qaeda, etc. right now, if you look at the backs on the ground -- the facts on the ground, there's a one man so far, he is 32, norwegian. he has attacked the central power, but also a political party youth camp on the island. there is the possibility that this is a norwegian domestic extremist. >> does norway have any anti- government extremist groups that you are aware of? >> not that i am aware of. i have posed this question to people and they say no. norwegians will tell you that they have had threats in the past from al qaeda-linked groups. there was an alleged plot under arrest last year and a number of people were arrested. it was linked to peripheral lead to the whole danish cartoon issue. norwegians are absolutely battled but -- baffled by this. i think people are starting to look for other explanations. the fact is, this man is a norwegian. he is a lawyer. i presume he is talking to the present -- the police. he seems to be incredibly organized. there is talk of 100 kilos surrounding 220 tons of explosives used in the oslo
's ability to prevent al qaeda from gaining a foothold, or i should say a stronghold, in the country. as was brought up concerns about the growing humanitarian and economic crises that are plaguing yemen today. al qaeda's presence in yemen is not new. we know that, it has grown increasingly worrisome the past couple years. al qaeda in the arabian peninsula as we know by the aqap has acquired, i should say has carried out multiple attacks against the people of yemen. and also against americans as well as other countries and her citizens. we all remember the foiled christmas day so-called underwear bomber attack and 2009, which revealed aqap's strategy of direct attacks on the united states homeland. october of last year gemini terrorist again targeted the united states homeland with ups packages containing explosives, one of the packages was bound for the philadelphia international airport, in my home state of pennsylvania. given the direct threat that aqap poses to the united states national ticket interests, and taking into account significant gains made in u.s. operations and again
of murder but convicted of lying to police. what's next for casey anthony? >>> plus al qaeda making a come back in afghanistan. details of bold new attacks on u.s. forces. how'd you do it? eating right, whole grain. [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios... five whole grains, 110 calories. ♪ [ doug ] i got to figure this out. ♪ [ dr. ling ] i want to spend more time with my patients. [ jim ] i need to build a new app for the sales team in beijing. [ mrs. davis ] i need to make science as exciting as a video game. ♪ [ jim ] i need to push out a software upgrade. [ dr. ling ] review ms. cooper's history. [ doug ] i need to cut i.t. costs. [ mrs. davis ] i need to find a way to break through. [ jim ] i need to see my family while they're still awake. [ dr. ling ] see if the blood work is ready. [ doug ] i need to think about something else when i run. ♪ [ male announcer ] every day, we set out to do more than the day before. at dell, everything we do, from solutions to services, gives you the power to do jus
here. >> thank you. >>> up next, how can an al qaeda terrorist in afghanistan, a triple agent, if you will, manage to infiltrate the cia and kill seven operatives? we're going to talk to the author of a hit new book that takes us inside the 2009 attack. that's next, and this is "hardball" only on msnbc. >>> the u.s. government's remaining shares in the company meaning the government's $12.5 billion bailout ended up costing taxpayers $1.3 billion. >>> we'll be right back. 8gg@ú >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been more than two months since u.s. special forces shot and killed osama bin laden. in the wake of that success, it's easy to forget the long, hard road to get there. back in debt of 2009, the cia thought he had the ultimate double agent who would lead them to the top echelon of al qaeda but turn out to be a triple agent, buried so deeply into the cia when he detonated the bomb he was wearing he killed seven cia agents as well as himself. "washington post" national correspondent jody warrick writes an that and how the cia was duped in his new book calmed "the triple threat:
? >> eric: we'll be talking to former u.s. ambassador, john bolton about pakistan and al qaeda. peter, thank you, jamie. >> jamie: a bold assessment on the war on terror from defense secretary leon.naet, the pentagon chief saying the u.s. is within reach of defeating al qaeda and making the comments on the first trip to afghanistan since taking the post. david piper is streaming live from kabul with more. david? >> reporter: hi, jamie. yes, america's new defense secretary already traveling around the country, finding out what the situation is on the ground here. today, he has been in southern afghanistan, where the majority of the fighting has been taking place in recent years. and, where the majorities of u.s. forces are currently based. this is of course panetta's first overseas trips since being appointed to his new role an afghanistan is a key responsibility for him. the defense secretary has been, though, very up beat about prospects of defeating al qaeda. >> now is the moment, following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we conti
of the political news 24/7 at cnn/politics.com. >>> al qaeda terrorists. find out why some say they are on the brink of collapse. >>> cops combing the farm that belonged to the suspected norway gunman. what they found and why it's concerning them next. naturals from purina cat chow. delicious, real ingredients with no artificial flavors or preservatives. naturals from purina cat chow. share a better life. handle more than 165 billion letters and packages a year. that's about 34 million pounds of mail every day. ever wonder what this costs you as a taxpayer? millions? tens of millions? hundreds of millions? not a single cent. the united states postal service doesn't run on your tax dollars. it's funded solely by stamps and postage. brought to you by the men and women of the american postal worker's union. i don't know. the usual? [ blower whirring ] sometimes it pays to switch things up. my - what, my hair? no. car insurance. i switched to progressive and they gave me discounts for the time i spent with my old company. saved a bunch. that's a reason to switch. big savings -- it'
. >> reporter: al qaeda's vow of revenge for osama bin laden's killing is no idle threat. >> tourists, people working in other cities. they think that's a lot easier, and it probably is a lot easier, then coming back to attack washington or new york. >> reporter: the state department bulletin warns of an enhanced potential for anti-american violence, given the death of osama bin laden. "current information suggests that al qaeda and affiliated organizations continue to plan terrorist attacks." sources tell abc news that after bin laden's killing, al qaeda's new leader, ayman al zawahiri, told operatives to target americans wherever they can be found. not just the u.s. homeland. according to the state department, americans should be concerned about suicide operations, assassinations, kidnappings, hijackings and bombings. u.s. officials are also mindful that bin laden had encouraged leaders to attack the u.s. by the tenth anniversary of 9/11. >> there is a desire to do an attack, and therefore americans whether they're at home or abroad need to take that into account, as well as the new guidanc
to al qaeda. sharif worked at five nuclear power plants doing maintenance work, then moved to yemen to follow anwar al awlaki. he was named after he allegedly expressed militant islamic views. mobley admits he admeyers al awlaki, but is not tied to -- to encourage attacks on sensitive locations. a u.s. officials says this week's warning is not based on new intelligence nor from a treasure trove of material confiscated from osama bin laden's compound. dms tells cnn there is no credible imminent threat. however, the several previous incidents illustrate an ongoing need to be on guard. wolf? >> good advice indeed, thanks, susan, very much. >>> later this hour i'll be speaking with janet napolitano about the threat to america's utility plants, also about concerns of a terror attack exactly ten years after 9/11. stand by for that interview. >>> also new information and new tally of what taxpayers lost by bailing out chrysler. the price tag is big. we've been using cnn's global resources to explore the heartbreaking famine in so somalia. how kenya is suffering as well. stay with us, you'r
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